Search

Gavin Turk’s new exhibition tackles Hackney gentrification

PUBLISHED: 18:01 19 September 2016 | UPDATED: 11:33 20 September 2016

Gavin Turk's Exhaust etching

Gavin Turk's Exhaust etching

Archant

The recent announcement that Vittoria Wharf in Hackney Wick is to be demolished brought a familiar word to everyone’s lips: gentrification.

The local art scene in Hackney Wick has seen better days.

The area used to be renowned for its collection of artists, but the recent announcement that Vittoria Wharf is to be demolished brought a familiar word to everyone’s lips: gentrification. The warehouse has long been home to a host of art studios, galleries and independent businesses, and plans to replace it with a footbridge seems to speak volumes about the direction the area was heading in.

But local Young British Artist Gavin Turk doesn’t plan on taking recent developments lying down, and is fighting back the only way he knows how: by creating art.

Teaming up with social enterprise Creative Wick and a host of other local businesses, Gavin has created a series of prints which he hopes will help promote the local art scene in Hackney Wick.

“The idea came about because it just seemed like the right time to do something,” says Turk.

“There are so many people who were here who have had to move out already, and I felt something needed to be done.”

The exhibition, Transit, launches a series of new etchings derived from the emissions of Turk’s white transit van. Profits from the sale of the prints will go towards the ongoing work of Creative Wick, and founder William Chamberlain feels it’s important to get local businesses involved in the project.

“Initiatives like this enable us to raise awareness of the constant struggle for recognition of the vital role that artists and the wider creative economy play in the process of urban renewal,” he says.

“Working alongside local companies such as Currell estate agents is important, because it gives them a sense of the culture of the area. Estate agents are often seen as the agents of gentrification, but if we can get them involved from the start they can truly appreciate the value of a creative economy to the area.”

The exhibition will take place in furniture shop Béton Brut, with a transit van crushed into a perfect cuboid as the centre piece.

And Turk hopes it will go some way toward making people appreciate the unique nature of a local art scene.

“I just hope it will make people aware of the value of art,” he says. “It’s a small step, but it keeps the conversation going, and that’s important.”

The exhibition will run up until December 10. Viewings in the week are by appointment only, but the gallery will be open from 12 to 5 on Saturdays.

To find out more, visit: betonbrut.co.uk/gallery

0 comments

Welcome , please leave your message below.

Optional - JPG files only
Optional - MP3 files only
Optional - 3GP, AVI, MOV, MPG or WMV files
Comments

Please log in to leave a comment and share your views with other Islington Gazette visitors.

We enable people to post comments with the aim of encouraging open debate.

Only people who register and sign up to our terms and conditions can post comments. These terms and conditions explain our house rules and legal guidelines.

Comments are not edited by Islington Gazette staff prior to publication but may be automatically filtered.

If you have a complaint about a comment please contact us by clicking on the Report This Comment button next to the comment.

Not a member yet?

Register to create your own unique Islington Gazette account for free.

Signing up is free, quick and easy and offers you the chance to add comments, personalise the site with local information picked just for you, and more.

Sign up now

Latest Islington Entertainment Stories

Fri, 12:28

Chelsea Clinton and local poet Jan Nobles appear at this year’s Stoke Newington Literary Festival

Mon, 14:48

The Star is hosting a bank holiday street party to celebrate a decade since its launch in Bethnal Green Road.

Thursday, May 17, 2018

BBC presenter Zeb Soanes launches children’s books series inspired by his close-up encounter with an Islington fox

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Cally man Dan Storey gave up art at 15 despite loving it. Now 42, he tells the Gazette about his first exhibition, which is running until June.

PROMOTED CONTENT

Fostering older teenagers means giving them the skills for life as an adult. Here, a supportive lodgings carer with Islington Council and young adult who has left care share their stories

“I try and do my best to enhance the young person’s capabilities. I’m very focused on their education, their wellbeing and their cultural needs.”

Newsletter Sign Up

Islington Gazette twice-weekly newsletter
Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Most read entertainment

Show Job Lists

Digital Edition

cover

Enjoy the
Islington Gazette
e-edition today

Subscribe

Education and Training

cover

Read the
Education and Training
e-edition today

Read Now