Search

Theatre Review: Anne Boleyn at the Globe

16:30 22 July 2011

In the sights of a king: James Garnon as King James I and Miranda Raison as Anne Boleyn. Picture: Manuel Harlan

In the sights of a king: James Garnon as King James I and Miranda Raison as Anne Boleyn. Picture: Manuel Harlan

Manuel Harlan, Manuel Harlan

A vibrant production charts the rise and fall of a queen.

The Word of God season at Shakespeare’s Globe continues with Howard Brenton’s Anne Boleyn, a huge hit for the Globe when it debuted in 2010.

Focussing not only on the rise and fall of the second wife of Henry VIII, the King’s divorce and the reformation of the Catholic Church, the play also depicts the reign of James I and his creation of the King James Bible, commissioned in order to reconcile the chasm caused by Henry which spilt the English Church.

Miranda Raison (from TV’s Spooks) plays Anne Boleyn (a famously small, brunette woman) and from the off she appears to be strange casting. The part is hugely demanding and the geography of the Globe cries out for a connection with the audience that Raison doesn’t completely achieve.

James Garnon however gives a master class in acting on an Elizabethan stage, with his electric portrayal of King James I. Full to bursting with uncontrollable twitches, spasms and paroxysms, Garnon’s monarch is an awe-inspiring performance and worthy of the ticket price alone.

Brenton’s script is vibrant, punchy and accessible, and the cast deliver it with a fitting amount of pace, gusto and fervour. Well-worth a visit to Bankside.

* Showing at Shakespeare’s Globe in New Globe Walk, Bankside, until Sunday, August 21.

0 comments

Latest Entertainment Stories

Thursday, August 27, 2015
A still from Asylum

A 1972 documentary covering the psychiatrist’s controversial establishments where doctors and patients live alike is being released on DVD, finds Anna Behrmann.

Wednesday, August 26, 2015
Barrence Whitfield

Down’n’dirty, tough-talkin’ and soulful blues/rock’n’roll mash-up

Wednesday, August 26, 2015
The Dance of Reality. Picture: Pathe

Filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky looks back at his childhood in a surreal and unique way, even if it does all become a bit much for Michael Joyce.

Wednesday, August 26, 2015
Benedict Cumberbatch (Hamlet) in Hamlet at the Barbican. Picture: Johan Persson

Benedict Cumberbatch shines as the tortured prince and while too dark at times, Hamlet is worthy of the hype, says Bridget Galton

Most read entertainment

Competitions

Get ready to take in the beautiful sights of London from above!

Are you always seeking unique ways to see your favourite city? This one is for you.

Shop till you drop!

Home to top name brands at great prices, TK Maxx is more like a treasure hunt than a shop. Perfect for grabbing a bargain or some hidden gems, you arm yourself with a trolley and go wild.

Digital Edition

Image
Read the Islington Gazette e-edition today E-edition
Family Notices 24


Our trusted business finder