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Young and old chill out at King’s Cross Ice Cream Festival

16:43 06 September 2012

Leah Walker uses liquid nitrogen to freeze an ice cream at the King

Leah Walker uses liquid nitrogen to freeze an ice cream at the King's Cross Ice Cream Festival. Photo by Dieter Perry

Dieter Perry

Hordes of sweet-toothed foodies flocked to King’s Cross for an ice cream carnival at the weekend.

Children and grown-ups alike indulged their taste buds as Granary Square was transformed into a festival celebrating the frozen treat on Saturday and Sunday.

Ten vendors from across the capital served up everything from ices dramatically frozen on the spot with liquid nitrogen to chilli and chocolate-flavoured sorbet.

King’s Cross hosted the festivities because of its pivotal role in the nation’s ice cream history. Ken Hazeldine, who gave history lessons while dressed as Swiss ice cream pioneer Carlo Gatti, said: “Carlo Gatti brought it to the masses and King’s Cross is where he had an ice well and started his business.

“The festival had a huge attendance that exceeded everybody’s expectations. The vendors all had huge queues in front of them and it was a great success.”

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