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Five great Roses from around the Med

PUBLISHED: 09:30 30 July 2020 | UPDATED: 09:30 30 July 2020

Rose wine reccs and 
1: Haut Gléon in the Vallée du Paradis, source of fine rosé
2: More and more rosé to meet demand: the bottling line at Maison Ventenac
 3: Organically grown vines at Domaine Gayda

Rose wine reccs and 1: Haut Gléon in the Vallée du Paradis, source of fine rosé 2: More and more rosé to meet demand: the bottling line at Maison Ventenac 3: Organically grown vines at Domaine Gayda

Archant

Wine expert Liz rounds up the best pinks from Italy France and Spain - and encourages staycationers to enjoy a picnic in an English vineyard

Rose wine reccs and 
1: Haut Gléon in the Vallée du Paradis, source of fine rosé
2: More and more rosé to meet demand: the bottling line at Maison Ventenac
 3: Organically grown vines at Domaine GaydaRose wine reccs and 1: Haut Gléon in the Vallée du Paradis, source of fine rosé 2: More and more rosé to meet demand: the bottling line at Maison Ventenac 3: Organically grown vines at Domaine Gayda

If you’ve missed eating out in the sun during July’s National Picnic Month, don’t despair. One increasing attraction at England’s vineyards is an invitation to picnic (often with tempting food and wine available) among the vines all summer long. Vineyards throughout the south east are open now after lockdown and wine picnics can be enjoyed at places as prettily compact as Albury Organic Vineyard, near Guildford, or as expansive as Rathfinny Estate, high on the South Downs above Alfriston.

For suggestions, go to winegb.co.uk, type “picnic” into the search box on the Explore Our Vineyards page and start planning.

Of course, in an English vineyard you’ll drink the local produce – savour fine still whites and rosés as well as award-winning celebratory bubbles.

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To continue the broader pink theme, here are more pleasures from further afield.

Tuscan rosé is a recent but still rare development, though production is growing. Ricasoli Albia (£12, Waitrose) is a pale, rose-and-red-fruit scented delight, crisp with a touch of creaminess, made from white-fermented sangiovese – the chianti grape – and merlot.

Or head to Sicily for pretty and versatile Santa Tresa Rosa (£11, Majestic), a fragrant, generously fruited expression of organically grown indigenous nero d’avola and frappato grapes.

Back in France, and to fizz: crémants are stylish and great value. Try Simonnet-Febvre Crémant de Bourgogne Rosé (£15.75, vinatis.co.uk), where there is engaging red pinot noir fruit and delicate bubbles.

Down south again, and Foncalieu Le Versant Grenache Rosé (£10, henningswine.co.uk) has generous warm cherry and red berry aromas and flavours, finishing clean and fresh – a sophisticated crowd-pleaser.

Grenache – under its Spanish name garnacha – is the main grape, too, in Ramón Bilbao Rioja Rosada (£8.85, greatwine.co.uk), a wine that truly shines with food.


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