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A stand off between Stalin and Russian poet Anna Akhamatova is brought to compelling life in Olivia Olsen's humane exploration of creativity and courage

A hugely enjoyable, lusty gender swap prdouction fails to shed fresh light on Shakespeare's problematic play of coersive control

Miriam Margolyes stands out as vicious wheelchair bound Nell in a dysfunctional violent relationship with her inadequate son

A fresh, hilarious and gender-blind modern take on Shakespeare's classic comedy of love and trust

When the titular Vassa, matriarch of the squabbling family in Mike Bartlett's adaptation of Maxim Gorky's Vassa Zheleznova, screams 'Enough!' during a blazing exchange in Act Three, it is a declaration shared by the audience.

When Robert Chesley's provocative play, Jerker, premiered at a Los Angeles theatre in 1986, it had a seismic impact almost straight away.

A production that tickles the senses and stokes the fire of curiosity with a well-paced, well-structured story.

Drama about the Edwardian scandal of a diet regime that killed patients fails to explore either motivations or echoes with modern health crazes

Toby Stephens and Claire Skinner shine as the struggling parents of a severely disabled child in a lacerating black comedy that will make you laugh and cry

A seven course tasting menu and a poignant drama of loss and migration offer food for thought

A different comedy scene every 27 seconds. That's what we're to expect at the Hen & Chickens Theatre next Sunday, as 101 Sketches in 50 Minutes makes its London bow.

Tracy-Ann Oberman gives a bravura performance as a single mum struggling to come to terms with her teenage son's horrific crime

In these crazy, hazy days of September 2019 when life in our reliable parliamentary democracy has degenerated into a scenario that even the most fanciful writer couldn't make up, then it's time for entertainment.

Brenda Kapowitz is living any parent's absolute worst nightmare. A single mother to Matthew and Jason, she's doing her best to maintain a career and hold her fragile family life together in the face of intense media scrutiny and a colossal feeling of guilt. Matthew is, after all, under house-arrest on suspicion of committing a heinous act.

Based on the fatal shooting af a black teen by a white policeman, Dael Orlandersmith performs her own devastating poetic monologues which spotlight the racism that divides and distorts America

Alex Jennings and Lindsay Duncan are at the top of their game as warring spouses trading jibes about Tory privilege

Phoebe Waller-Bridge is a TV superstar (Fleabag, Killing Eve), a Star Wars standout, and the feminist saviour of James Bond. But never mind all that; theatre needs her back.

Singer, actress, presenter and author Mica Paris talks to Marianka Swain about the 30th anniversary production of Fame, coming to London's Peacock Theatre.

If you are sensitive to a profane tongue, you might want to skip past the expletive-licious charms of Skin in the Game. Or at least cover your ears a bit.

Robert Icke's Almeida swansong is a typically bold and epic updating - this time, of Arthur Schnitzler's 1912 Professor Bernhardi.

Matthew Bourne is the master par excellence in the re-interpretation of classics... and who could guess how he would present Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet?

A few years ago there was a revival of interest in Frank Hurley's remarkable black and white images of the Boy's Own sounding Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition.

Andy Stanton's cult children's books gets a colourful funny musical treatment with a geniunely bad baddie

"When I was little," Janacek Wood recalls, "my Dad decided it would be fun to take me and my brother sledging down a mountainside in an inflatable kids' paddling pool. It took off like a hovercraft, he couldn't stop, hit a tree, and we were catapulted out onto the track below."

A zesty adaptation of Jill Murphy's classic boarding school saga is a bubbling cauldron of girl power and magical power that had me spellbound

A brilliantly acted Shane Meadows-esque story of two runaways misses brilliance but its blunt realism yields some eye-catching moments

The Holloway children's author translates the surreal and silly world of Lamonic Bibber into a stage musical

Peter Schaffer's 1970s homoerotic play about a boy who blinds horses gets a precise and exhilirating revival

Overegged but fun revival proves Rice and Lloyd Webber's biblical classic is indestructible

This weekend, four young female comedians will combine their talents at the Playmill Festival of New Writing. Girls With Jokes will take in everything from motherhood to mental health, mortgages to millenial prospects at King's Head Theatre on July 13 and 14.

Playwright David Hendon's latest work is about Oliver Sipple: a Vietnam veteran who found his personal life picked apart in the national press after an instinctive heroic act.

The first British Vietnamese play, this affecting family drama is a warm and lucid take on the tensions between second generation immigrants and their parents

Flawed but incendiary study of an immigrant family in 60s New York peaks too soon but is effective when its conflicts come together

Far more than a green polemic, this Frankenstein of a play is a glorious absurdist blend of stand-up, drama, dance/disco radio and mime.

This weekend's Elixir Extracts Festival is a celebration of lifelong creativity taking place at Sadler's Wells: the theatre on Rosebery Avenue devoted to dance in all its forms.

"Never make the mistake of taking acting too seriously." This was the advice that actress Coral Browne followed throughout her stage and screen career, from the moment she fled Australia in 1934 as a 20-year-old hopeful.

Thirty years on, Philip Osment's witty, lyrical coming of age tale in the age of Aids and Section 28 stands the test of time

Jonathan Maitland's hilarious satire at Park Theatre imagines a future when the mop haired MP has been knighted and is still grasping at high office

Bojo, Brexit and the burden of high office are debated at the Islington dinner party which 'changed history' says playwright Jonathan Maitland

An under rehearsed, patchily acted and self indulgently limp satire of the 2015 election misses an open goal to shed light on today's political meltdown

Fresh off Olivier Award wins for Summer and Smoke, director Rebecca Frecknall and actress Patsy Ferran reunite at the Almeida - bringing a similarly expressive approach to Chekhov as they did to Tennessee Williams.

Alexis Michalik's prison-set dark comedy boasts strong performances and explores human fallibility, but is tonally uneven and strains for credibility

Alexis Michalik's prison-set dark comedy boasts strong performances and explores human fallibility, but is tonally uneven and strains for credibility

Two years ago Elliot Warren was performing his debut play in front of two or three people a night. Now he's won an Olivier Award for it.

Caryl Churchill's 80s feminist classic gets an epic revival that has contemporary resonance if it sometimes lacks clarity and intimacy

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