Duke of Edinburgh to Charterhouse brother: ‘You look starved!’

The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh are greeted as they open a new development at Charterhouse. Picture:

The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh are greeted as they open a new development at Charterhouse. Picture: Chris Jackson/PA - Credit: PA Wire/PA Images

The Duke of Edinburgh met his “brother” when he visited an ancient Clerkenwell almshouse today, jokingly telling his sibling: “you look starved”.

Charterhouse almshouse brothers await the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh. Picture: Chris Jackson/PA

Charterhouse almshouse brothers await the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh. Picture: Chris Jackson/PA - Credit: PA Wire/PA Images

Philip caught up with Graham Matthews when he joined the Queen for a visit to Charterhouse, in Charterhouse Square, where she opened a new museum and learning centre.

Both the Queen and the Duke are each associated with a brother, as the almshouse residents are known, inviting them to royal events such as garden parties and lunches.

Mr Matthews, 81, a retired cathedral organist and one of 45 brothers living at the site, said: “The last time I was at the palace, he said to me ‘you look emaciated’ and this time he said to me ‘you look starved’ and I said to him ‘well they do look after us very well here’.

The Queen at the historic Charterhouse in Clerkenwell today. Picture: Chris Jackson/PA

The Queen at the historic Charterhouse in Clerkenwell today. Picture: Chris Jackson/PA - Credit: PA Wire/PA Images

He played the National Anthem on a chapel organ during a brief plaque unveiling ceremony performed by the Queen, and added: “He always likes to leave you with a smile, a little joke and he did the same again.”


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Charterhouse dates back to the 14th century. It has transitioned from a monastery to Tudor mansions to a school to an almshouse – as it has been for 400 years. It opened to the public for the first time ever last month.

Reporting by Press Association

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