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Islington Council to intervene on aggressive kids who have suffered domestic violence

PUBLISHED: 07:00 08 February 2017

Islington Council staff observed a clear link between children seeing or experiencing domestic violence and subsequently getting caught up in the criminal justice system. Picture: Dominic Lipinski/PA

Islington Council staff observed a clear link between children seeing or experiencing domestic violence and subsequently getting caught up in the criminal justice system. Picture: Dominic Lipinski/PA

PA Archive/PA Images

Islington schoolchildren who show signs of aggressive behaviour after experiencing domestic violence are to receive special support.

It is part of a new strategy, launched today, to tackle violence against women and girls in Islington.

Part of the scheme will see children hear stories from women who have suffered violence to ensure they don’t grow up thinking it is acceptable.

Council staff who work with vulnerable young people observed a “clear link” between children seeing or experiencing domestic violence and subsequently getting caught up in the criminal justice system.

Islington Council will work with police and partner organisations to identify aggressive behaviour among schoolchildren.

According to Cally charity Solace Women’s Aid, there were more than 2,000 domestic crimes committed against women in the 12 months up to September last year.

And Cllr Andy Hull, Islington’s community safety leader, said: “Violence against women and girls (VAWG) in all its forms is completely unacceptable. One of my top priorities is to ensure that the council, together with our partners, is fully committed to preventing and tackling it.

“We know that exposure to VAWG early on in life has long-term consequences. It is not a standalone issue but rather one that is inherently connected to other serious social challenges that we face in the borough. The majority of young people caught up in gangs in Islington, for instance, have experienced domestic violence as children.”

By Easter, the council wants to have started piloting the NSPCC’s “Domestic Abuse Recovering Together” scheme, in which victims of violence have the chance to meet other mothers and children who have lived through similar trauma.

The town hall also plans to train children’s workers to respond to other forms of VAWG which may be less obvious than physical abuse, such as “sexting”.


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