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Police purge on Islington/Hackney border sees hunting knife siezed

PUBLISHED: 15:30 23 September 2015 | UPDATED: 17:30 23 September 2015

The hunting knife that was handed to police during the operation

The hunting knife that was handed to police during the operation

Archant

A hunting knife found at a bus stop and a samurai sword on a housing estate were among weapons recovered during a police operation.

On Friday, 120 officers took part in “Operation Red Kite” around Blackstock Road, which is on the border of Islington and Hackney boroughs.

The operation was to build relationships between the two forces, and ensure criminals don’t go under the radar when crossing borough boundaries.

Officers were deliberately visible throughout the day, and results included:

■ Eleven arrests for theft, fraud, drunk and disorderly behaviour, assault and various drug 
offences.

■ Four immigration visits were made, resulting in two arrests from separate commercial premises.

■ Following weapon sweeps, a knife was recovered on the Woodberry Down Estate in Hackney and a samurai sword from the Andover Estate in Islington.

■ And a member of the public handed in a hunting knife to officers at the Safer Neighbourhoods base in Blackstock Road. He had found the knife at a nearby bus stop.

Supt Jo Edwards, who led the operation, said: “This area, around Blackstock Road, is right on the border of Hackney and Islington. What can happen is crimes will fall between the two local authorities and police boroughs. People who engage in this aren’t going to stick to one side of the road. Today is about more visible, proactive policing but also building relationships between the two forces.

“A lot of what happens around here is criminal damage and anti-social behaviour issues like noise, minor assaults. Plus, gang related crimes can flair up. They are all things that can cause fear in people and what we are trying to combat.”

Asked whether Friday’s operation could be expected to have a long-term effect, Supt Edwards added: “This today is not a one-off. It’s part of a series, with the next one planned for November.

“But I understand the point: a lot of people ask whether one operation is going to solve the problems. But once those relationships have been built between the forces and boroughs, we will be in a much stronger position for solving problems.”


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