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Second police dispersal zone for troubled Highbury estate

PUBLISHED: 14:00 16 July 2015

Curfew: The Highbury Quadrant Estate is subject to a dispersal order

Curfew: The Highbury Quadrant Estate is subject to a dispersal order

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Police are using a number of measures to tackle an expected rise in anti-social behaviour over the summer months

Highbury Quadrant has been placed under dispersal order measures for the second time in six months in response to community concerns over increases in anti-social behaviour during the summer period.

The estate has previously been plagued with violence including the stabbing of a 54-year-old man in June and a series of moped-related thefts and mattresses being set on fire.

Under Section 35 of the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014, Islington Police are empowered to tell anyone who is believed to be causing disorder or intimidation on the Highbury Quadrant Estate, off Catherall Road, to leave the area for 48 hours.

The dispersal zone began at midday on Monday and ended yesterday (Wednesday) at midday.

Richard Padwell, Inspector for Islington East Cluster Safer Neighbourhood Team, said that the dispersal zone was “one of a number of measures” Islington Police were using in partnership with the council to protect the estate’s residents.

In addition to leafleting local residents to raise awareness, dedicated police ward officers have done walkarounds the estate with the local councillors to identify physical measures that can insure against incidents of ASB.

Police are also seeking additional orders against persistent offenders.

He said: “In the first day of operating the dispersal zone, three arrests were made, two of which included breaching the dispersal boundary.”

Two people were also given cannabis warnings.

Terry Stacy, chairman of the Highbury East Safer Neighbourhood Panel said: “It’s great to see the police using all the tools at their disposal to deal with the growing problem of anti-social behaviour on the Highbury Quadrant Estate.

“Residents want to see action, not wishy, washy talk about ‘having compassion’ for people who are making their neighbours lives hell.”


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