Voyeur descendant of famous explorer used James Bond-style pen camera to spy on nude women at King’s Cross gym

Anytime Fitness in Pentonville Road (Google streetview)

Anytime Fitness in Pentonville Road (Google streetview) - Credit: Archant

The voyeur nephew of a former High Commissioner to India is facing jail after using a James Bond-style pen camera to spy on women at a King’s Cross Gym.

Oliver Gore-Booth, 34, used the hi-tech device to secretly film women at the Anytime Gym, Pentonville Road, and took the pen camera on the Tube to take perverted upskirt pictures of women on the escalators.

The HR manager, who is the great, great grandson of arctic explorer and 5th Baronet Gore, Sir Henry Gore-Booth, amassing three years worth of secret videos between 2011 and 2014 before he was discovered.

He also used to camera to film guests at a private bathroom at his home in Waldron Road, Wandsworth.

Gore-Booth, whose uncle is the late Sir David Gore-Booth, was rumbled in June last year when a gym user found the spy camera. He admitted five counts of voyeurism and four of outraging public decency at Blackfriars Crown Court today, where Judge Henry Blacksell warned him to prepare for a jail term when he is sentenced next month.


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Judge Blacksell said: “It was over a fair old period of time and I can’t ignore that it’s a camera he set up for these purposes.

“There is a history of using a camera in order to obtain images that he found gratifying and it’s obviously an affront to those he abuses in this way.

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“This obviously does cross the custody threshold.”

When police searched Gore-Booth’s home they found a laptop containing videos and images he had amassed using the device.

Gore-Booth, who attended a £10,000 a term private school in Dorset and has worked for companies such as Sky, Eurostar, Viacom, and moo.com, was released on bail on the condition that he does not visit the Anytime gym.

Sentencing will be on February 26.

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