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Eight-year-old Lord Sugars set to take Christmas chutney market by storm

PUBLISHED: 11:58 06 November 2014

Reuben Elliot, left, Baylie Melhad, and Ava Walters, of Rosemary Works School, taste their own-made chutney from school-grown tomatoes

Reuben Elliot, left, Baylie Melhad, and Ava Walters, of Rosemary Works School, taste their own-made chutney from school-grown tomatoes

Archant

An army of seven- and eight-year-old Lord Sugars are set to take the Christmas chutney market by storm as part of a school project.

Ollie Woollard, left,and Lily Hamil, of Rosemary Works School, talk to reporter Jon Dean about  their own-made chutney from school-grown tomatoesOllie Woollard, left,and Lily Hamil, of Rosemary Works School, talk to reporter Jon Dean about their own-made chutney from school-grown tomatoes

Pupils at Rosemary Works School, in Branch Place, have spent the last few weeks growing their own tomatoes, picking them and turning them into a delicious spiced preserve.

The youngsters conducted market research, compared the product with rivals and designed the posters and packaging. Next month they plan to set up a stall in Spitalfields Market to sell their RW Chutney and raise cash for charity.

Lily Hamil, seven, said: “We have been preparing our own tomato chutney. 
We collected and picked the 
tomatoes from our own 
garden.”

Louis Deshpande, seven, added: “We have been tasting different chutneys to see if they are nice or yucky and choosing our favourites.”

Matilda Taylor Croket, left, and Lily Mae Hanrehem Griffiths, of Rosemary Works School, taste their own-made chutney from school-grown tomatoesMatilda Taylor Croket, left, and Lily Mae Hanrehem Griffiths, of Rosemary Works School, taste their own-made chutney from school-grown tomatoes

Comparing

Reuben McKinney Rowe, who turns eight today (Thursday), said: “We are comparing our chutney with ones from the shop. I’ve given our one 10 out of 10.”

But RW Chutney wasn’t the unanimous winner. Seven-year-old Baylie Melhado thought it had “too much spice in it”.

Matilda Taylor Crockett, seven, said: “We are going to sell it at Spitalfields Market on our own stall.”

Ollie Woollard, left, Baylie Melhad, and Lily Hamil, of Rosemary Works School, taste their own-made chutney from school-grown tomatoesOllie Woollard, left, Baylie Melhad, and Lily Hamil, of Rosemary Works School, taste their own-made chutney from school-grown tomatoes

The budding business brains’ teacher, Ross Stewart, was impressed by the youngsters’ entrepreneurial 
spirit.

“It’s amazing how quickly they have picked it up,” he said.

“I think some of them watch Young Apprentice, but it’s incredible. The take the ideas and run with them.

“I was concerned some of the concepts might be a bit advanced, but they got it straightaway, saying, ‘We could call it this, have a poster like that’ and so on.

“It’s all their own ideas.

“It’s good, because the project has elements of maths, literacy and science. And this is what is waiting for them after school.

“We’ve definitely got some young entrepreneurs in the class.”


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