Osborne Grove Nursing Home is saved - but campaigners’ wishes are set to be ignored

Cllr Peray Ahmet, Haringey's cabinet member for health. Picture: David Winskill

Cllr Peray Ahmet, Haringey's cabinet member for health. Picture: David Winskill - Credit: David Winskill

Osborne Grove Nursing Home will be saved, but the future for the centre that campaigners lobbied for is set to be ignored, according to a cabinet meeting last night.

Gordon Peters, chair of the Haringey over 50s forum, speaks to the Ham&High before the meeting. Pict

Gordon Peters, chair of the Haringey over 50s forum, speaks to the Ham&High before the meeting. Picture: David Winskill - Credit: David Winskill

The meeting saw a plea from the daughter of an existing resident that it should become a 32-bed home with both day care and longer-term care.

The option had been on the table, and was discussed at a “codesign” meeting with councillors and Osborne Grove campaigners on June 4.

But it had been dropped for the report that was put before the cabinet on Tuesday.

Instead, the council approved feasibility studies into either demolishing the home and rebuilding a 70-bed one, or expanding it to a 64-bed home.

Gordon Peters, chair of the Haringey over 50s forum, speaks to the Ham&High before the meeting. Pict

Gordon Peters, chair of the Haringey over 50s forum, speaks to the Ham&High before the meeting. Picture: David Winskill - Credit: David Winskill


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Ms Rodda, whose mother has lived at the home since 2008, said: “Option three needs only a feasibility report now. How can you run a 64-bed home if you can’t do a 32-bed home?”

In both plans the cabinet unanimously agreed to look into, the seven residents at the home would stay on site while work takes place.

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Ms Rodda believes this can’t happen, and called for them to look at a smaller facility with combined levels of care.

“The future of these residents is at risk because we know, for health and safety reasons, you cannot have sick people on site while extensive building work takes place,” she said.

Haringey’s new cabinet member for health, Peray Ahmet didn’t respond directly to their pleas, and no amendment was inserted.

Cllr Ahmet said: “There are some concerns about safety and service delivery at the home. What we think would make a difference to that is these two proposals.”

Gordon Peters, one of the campaigners to save the centre, said: “I’m glad they’ve realised it should be protected.

“Haringey seems to have made the decision to expand the facility, and that’s it. It does make it harder to get a good CQC rating in future, as it’s more difficult to give personalised care.”

He also said the future of the codesign group, which he chairs, could be in doubt. “We wanted a smaller home,” he said. “That was taken off the table. It has made it rather difficult for us now and Healthwatch thinks that it hasn’t been properly listened to.”

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