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Families who couldn’t visit loved ones on coronavirus death beds react to Dominic Cummings’ alleged lockdown breach

PUBLISHED: 15:56 27 May 2020 | UPDATED: 16:46 27 May 2020

Dominic Cummings leaves his north London home as the row over the Durham trip taken by prime minister Boris Johnson's top aide continues. Picture: PA images/ Kirsty O'Connor

Dominic Cummings leaves his north London home as the row over the Durham trip taken by prime minister Boris Johnson's top aide continues. Picture: PA images/ Kirsty O'Connor

PA Wire/PA Images

Families who could not visit loved ones on their death beds have reacted to Dominic Cummings’ alleged breach of lockdown rules.

A protester outside the north London home of Prime Minister Boris Johnson's senior aide Dominic Cummings after he gave a press conference over allegations he breached coronavirus lockdown restrictions. PA Photo. Picture date: Monday May 25, 2020. See PA story HEALTH Coronavirus. Photo credit should read: Aaron Chown/PA WireA protester outside the north London home of Prime Minister Boris Johnson's senior aide Dominic Cummings after he gave a press conference over allegations he breached coronavirus lockdown restrictions. PA Photo. Picture date: Monday May 25, 2020. See PA story HEALTH Coronavirus. Photo credit should read: Aaron Chown/PA Wire

Boris Johnson’s most senior adviser is facing calls to resign after he drove his wife and son 270 miles from his home in Canonbury to County Durham to stay at his parents’ farm on March 27.

Mr Cummings claims he drove to the North East because he needed help with childcare, alleging he acted legally and responsibly.

Theai San lost her father Win Tin Soe, a Holloway bus garage driver, to Covid-19 on April 10.

Theai, an NHS dental nurse, told the Gazette: “I think he decided to bend his own rules and I don’t think it’s fair that we as the public have to do one rule and he can do whatever he wants.

Win Tin Soe. Picture: Theai SanWin Tin Soe. Picture: Theai San

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“My dad knew he was going to die and he wanted to come home and die with his family – but he wasn’t allowed, even though that was his final wish.

“We had to [say goodbye] over video call - not having that last moment can be devastating.”

Former coach and vice president at Islington Boxing Club, Colin Webster, died with coronavirus on March 28. His family were also barred from visiting him in hospital to say goodbye.

Colin Webster. Picture: Islington Boxing ClubColin Webster. Picture: Islington Boxing Club

But reacting to the story about Mr Cummings, Colin’s son Danny said: “I must admit I think it’s all blown out of proportion. Lots of people out there have been doing a lot worse, going to gardens and flocking to parks.”

Islington Council leader Richard Watts said: “There seems to have been a clear breach of lockdown rules and I think carrying on in this way has clearly undermined confidence in public health advice, and in the government to be fair and impartial in it’s handling of the crisis. Therefore, that has a very real risk of making this national crisis worse and costing people their lives. The prime minister must move to fire him because it’s the only way now to try and establish even a small bit of lost confidence.”

The prime minister has stood by Mr Cummings, saying he acted “responsibly, legally and with integrity”.


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